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Handbook of waste management and co-product recovery in food processing (Volume 1)

Edited by K Waldron 
Woodhead  March 2007  



Hardback  680 pp  ISBN 9781845690250      £185.00
  • looks at the optimisation of manufacturing procedures to decrease waste, energy and water use
  • explores methods to valorise waste by co-product recovery
  • considers best practice in different sectors of the food industry

The intensification of agriculture and food production in recent years has led to an increase in the production of food co-products and wastes. Their disposal by incineration or landfill is often expensive as well as environmentally sensitive. Methods to valorise unused co-products and improve the management of wastes that cannot be reused, as well as techniques to reduce the quantity of waste produced in the first place, are increasingly important to the food industry. With its distinguished editor and array of international contributors, Waste management and co-product recovery in food processing reviews the latest developments in this area and describes how they can be used to reduce waste.

The first section of the book provides a concise introduction to the field with a particular focus on legislation and consumer interests, principle drivers of waste management. Part 2 addresses the minimisation of biowaste and the optimisation of water and energy use in food processing. The third section covers key technologies for co-product separation and recovery, such as supercritical fluid extraction and membrane filtration, as well as important issues to consider when recovering co-products, such as waste stabilisation and microbiological risk assessment. Part 4 offers specific examples of waste management and co-product exploitation in particular sectors such as the red meat, poultry, dairy, fish and fruit and vegetable industries. The final part of the book summarises advanced techniques, to dispose of waste products that cannot be reused, and reviews state of the art technologies for wastewater treatment.

Of interest to all those in the food processing industry concerned with waste minimisation, co-product valorisation and end waste management.

Contents

PART 1 KEY DRIVERS FOR WASTE MANAGEMENT AND CO-PRODUCT RECOVERY IN FOOD PROCESSING

  • Waste minimisation, management and co-product recovery in food processing: an introduction K Waldron, Institute of Food Research, UK
    - Introduction: food processing waste € the scale of the problem - Diversification and risk - Biological basis of bio-wastes - Legislation - Implementation of the hierarchy concept in relation to food processing co-products and wastes - High value components and whole waste exploitation - Layout and contents of this volume - Future trends
  • Consumer interests in food processing waste management and co-product recovery L J Frewer and B Gremmen, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
    - Introduction: consumer interests as a key driver to improve waste management in food processing - Societal issues related to sustainability - Implications for food processors - Future trends - References

PART 2 OPTIMISING MANUFACTURING TO MINIMISE WASTE IN FOOD PROCESSING

  • Chain management issues and good housekeeping procedures to minimise food processing waste R Sherman, North Carolina State University, USA
    - Introduction - Key reasons to minimise waste - Chain management to minimise waste - Good housekeeping procedures to minimise raw material waste - Effective implementation of measures to minimise waste - Case study - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Process optimisation to minimise energy use in food processing J Klemes and S J Perry, The University of Manchester, UK
    - Introduction: energy use in food processing - Energy saving and minimisation - Renewables in food industry - Overview of selected case studies - A case study € sugar processing - Further studies - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Process optimisation to minimise water use in food processing J Klemes and S J Perry, The University of Manchester, UK
    - Introduction: water use and wastage in food processing - How to minimise water usage and wastewater treatment - Overview of selected case studies - Sources of further information - References

PART 3 KEY ISSUES AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR FOOD WASTE SEPARATION AND CO-PRODUCT RECOVERY

  • The importance of microbiological risk management in the stabilization of food processing co-products T Brocklehurst, Institute of Food Research, UK
    - Introduction: importance of microbiological risk management in stabilisation of co-products - Strategies for microbiological risk management - Strategies for controlling micro organisms: methods of preservation - Future trends - References
  • Effects of post harvest changes in quality on the stability of plant co-products M E Salveit, University of California, USA
    - Introduction - Changes during the fruit ripening - Response to adverse environments - Changes in composition - Future trends - References
  • The potential for de-structuring of food processing waste by combination processing A Smith, Institute of Food Research, UK
    - Introduction - Destructuring effect on foods and their components - Lessons from other industries - Preservation processes - Tools for breakdown/disassembly - Processes - Examples of combination processing - Future trends - Further information - References
  • Enzymatic extraction and fermentation for the recovery of food processing products K Bélafi-Bakó, University of Veszprém, Hungary
    - Introduction and key issues - Biocatalytic methods - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Supercritical fluid extraction and other technologies for extraction of high value food processing co-products T H Walker, P Patel and K Cantrell, Clemson University, USA
    - Introduction - Key reasons - Supercritical fluid extraction - Modelling of solubility and mass transfer - Other technologies - Microwave assisted extraction - Future trends - Acknowledgements - References
  • Membrane and filtration technologies and the separation and recovery of food processing waste B Ditgens, University of Bonn, Germany
    - Introduction - Established membrane technologies - New fields pf application - Conclusions - Symbols - References
  • Separation technologies for food wastewater treatment and product recovery H M El-Mashad and R Zhang, University of California, USA
    - Introduction - Principles for separation - Separation and recovery technologies - Future trends - Conclusions - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 4 WASTE MANAGEMENT IN PARTICULAR FOOD INDUSTRY SECTORS AND RECOVERY OF SPECIFIC CO-PRODUCTS

  • Waste management and co-product recovery in red and white meat processing P Roupas, K De Silva and G Smithers, CSIRO-Food Science Australia and A Ferguson, Alamanda Enterprises Pty Ltd, Australia
    - Introduction - Waste minimisation processing and efficiency - Responsible waste disposal - Waste value-addition - Conclusions and future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Waste management and co-product recovery in dairy processing R J Durham and J A Hourigan, University of Western Sydney, Australia
    - Introduction - Worldwide dairy production trends - Current status of waste problems faced by dairy industry - Cleaner production in the dairy industry - Co-product recovery in dairy processing - Improving end waste management in dairy processing - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Waste management and co-product recovery in fish processing J Regenstein and S Goldhor, Cornell University, USA
    - Introduction - Co-product recovery and development - Utilising all the waste - Utilising part of the waste - Shellfish - Future trends - References
  • Recovery and reuse of trimmings and pulps from fruit and vegetable processing M Panouillé, M C Ralet, E Bonnin and J F Thibault, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France
    - Introduction - Origin and general characterisation of the by-products - Use of the whole by-products - Recovery of functional biopolymers - Upgrading of the mono/oligomeric components - Conclusions/Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • High-value co-products from plant foods: nutraceuticals, micronutrients, functional ingredients F A Tomás Barberán, CEBAS (CSIC), Spain
    - Introduction - Residues generation and key reasons for co-product recovery - Phytochemicals present in plant food residues - Uses of plant food residues as sources for phytochemical extracts - Sections on important sources of high-value co-products - Examples of phytochemical extracts from plant-food wastes - Technological processes for phytochemicals extraction from residues - Safety issues - Future trends - Conclusions - References
  • High-value co-products from plant foods: cosmetics and pharmaceuticals A Femenia, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Spain
    - Introduction - Key reasons for exploiting plant-derived compounds from co-products - Recovery of plant-based co-products for use in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Natural dyes from food processing wastes T Bechtoldm, A Mahmud-Ali and R Mussak, University of Innsbruck, Austria
    - Introduction - Natural dyes in technical textile dyeing operations - The extraction step - Sources for natural dyes € results of a screening for sources in food processing - Natural dyes from food processing wastes € representatives examples - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Improving waste management and co-product recovery in vegetable oil M Arienzo and P Violante, Universitŕ degli studi di Napoli Federico II, Italy
    - Introduction: improving waste management and co-product recovery in vegetable oil processing - Key reasons to improve waste management in vegetable oil processing - Co-product recovery in vegetable oil processing - Reducing waste in vegetable oil production - Improving end waste management in vegetable oil production - Future trends - References

PART 5 MINIMISING DISPOSAL: WASTEWATER AND SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY

  • Treatment of food processing wastewater D Bolzonella and F Cecchi, University of Verona and P Pavan, Cŕ Foscari University, Italy
    - Introduction - Food wastewaters production and characteristics - Analysis of conventional technologies for treatment of food processing and wastewater - Future trends - References
  • Dewatering systems for solid food processing waste V Orsat and G S Vijaya Raghavan, McGill University, Canada
    - Introduction - Waste conditioning - Dewatering methods - Combining dewatering methods - An environmental and economic choice - Conclusions - References
  • Fermentation, biogas and biohydrogen production from solid food processing C L Hansen and D-Y Cheong, Utah State University, USA
    - Introduction: fermentation, biogas and biohydrogen production from food waste - Key reasons to consider using anaerobic processes - Biochemical and microbiological principles of the anaerobic process: hydrolysis, acidgenesis, methanogenesis - Environmental and operational variables of anaerobic treatment - High rate anaerobic bio-conversion system - Requirement for high rate anaerobic bio-conversion systems - Single stage anaerobic digesters - Continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) - Separation of anaerobic processes in reactor systems - Bio-hydrogen production by anaerobic fermentation - Producing other chemicals and useful products from food waste - Future trends - References
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