Home


Food spoilage microorganisms

Edited by C Blackburn 
Woodhead  March 2006  



Hardback  736 pp  ISBN 9781855739666      £190.00
  • looks at tools, techniques and methods for the detection and analysis of microbial food spoilage
  • discusses the management control of microbial food spoilage
  • looks in detail at yeasts, moulds and bacteria

The control of microbiological spoilage requires an understanding of a number of factors including the knowledge of possible hazards, their likely occurrence in different products, their physiological properties and the availability and effectiveness of different preventative measures. Food spoilage microorganisms focuses on the control of microbial spoilage and provides an understanding necessary to do this.

The first part of this essential new book looks at tools, techniques and methods for the detection and analysis of microbial food spoilage with chapters focussing on analytical methods, predictive modelling and stability and shelf life assessment. The second part tackles the management of microbial food spoilage with particular reference to some of the major food groups where the types of spoilage, the causative microorganisms and methods for control are considered by product type. The following three parts are then dedicated to yeasts, moulds and bacteria in turn, and look in more detail at the major organisms of significance for food spoilage. In each chapter the taxonomy, spoilage characteristics, growth, survival and death characteristics, methods for detection and control options are discussed.

Food spoilage microorganisms takes an applied approach to the subject and will be an indispensable guide both for the microbiologist and the non-specialist, particularly those whose role involves microbial quality in food processing operations.

Contents

Introduction

PART 1 DETECTION AND ANALYSIS OF FOOD SPOILAGE

  • Quantitative detection and identification methods for microbial spoilage, D I Ellis and R Goodacre, University of Manchester, UK
    - Introduction - Microbial spoilage of meat and poultry - Microbial metabolites as possible markers of spoilage - Current detection methods - Identification methods - Quantitative methods - Emerging techniques - Data analysis - Conclusion - Acknowledgments - References
  • Detection, identification and enumeration methods for spoilage yeasts, C P Kurtzman, U.S. Department of Agriculture, USA
    - Introduction - Relationship of yeasts with other fungi - Products affected by yeasts - Detection, enumeration, isolation - Identification by conventional methods - Molecular methods for species identification - an overview - Rapid molecular methods for species identification and quantitation - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Detection, identification and enumeration methods for spoilage moulds, M A Cousin, Purdue University, USA
    - Introduction - Current enumeration methods and their limitations - Identification of moulds - New techniques and applications for mould enumeration and identification - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - Note on registered, trademark and commercial methods - References
  • Modelling microbial spoilage, P Braun, University of Leipzig, Germany and J P Sutherland, London Metropolitan University, UK
    - Introduction - Approaches to spoilage modelling - Developing spoilage models - Applications of spoilage models - Limitations of models - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Determining the stability and shelf-life of foods, G Betts, Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association, UK
    - Introduction - Product and process design - Design and operation of challenge tests - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 2 MANAGING FOOD SPOILAGE

  • Managing microbial food spoilage: an overview, C de W Blackburn, Unilever Colworth, UK
    - Introduction - Food preservation - Spoilage hazards - Microbial safety and spoilage - Management systems - Management tools - Management mechanisms - Application of spoilage management systems - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Managing microbial spoilage in the dairy industry, K Boor, Cornell University and H Fromm, International Food Network, USA
    - Introduction - The range of spoilage microorganisms - a historic perspective in the U.S - Current and emerging techniques for controlling spoilage microorganisms - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Managing microbial spoilage in cereal and baking products, N Magan and D Aldred, Cranfield University, UK
    - Introduction - Microbial contaminants of cereals and bakery products - Current control techniques - In situ control of moulds in grain and bakery products using anti-oxidants/essential oils - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Managing microbial spoilage in the meat industry, J Samelis, Dairy Research Institute, Greece
    - Introduction - Microbial ecology of fresh meat spoilage - Microbial ecology of processed meat spoilage - Current and emerging technologies to control spoilage of raw meat and poultry products - Current and emerging technologies to control spoilage of processed meat and poultry products - Detection and prediction of meat spoilage - Future trends - References

PART 3 SPOILAGE YEASTS

  • Zygosaccharomyces and related genera, C P Kurtzman, US Department of Agriculture, USA and S A James, Institute of Food Research, UK
    - Introduction - Products affected - Detection, enumeration and isolation of spoilage species - Classification of spoilage species - Identification of spoilage species - Characteristics of spoilage species - Conditions for spoilage - Strategies for control of spoilage - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Saccharomyces and related genera, G H Fleet, University of New South Wales, Australia
    - Introduction - Taxonomy of Saccharomyces - Association with food and beverage spoilage - Public health significance of Saccharomyces - Factors affecting survival and growth - Biochemical basis of spoilage - Isolation, enumeration, identification - Prevention of spoilage - Future trends - References
  • Candida and related genera, T Deak, Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary
    - Introduction - Brief history of the genus Candida - Characteristics - Teleomorphic connections - Classification - Growth and survival - Occurrence in foods - Control measures - Specific detection, enumeration, identification - Future trends - Sources of further information - References
  • Dekkera/Brettanomyces spp., V Loureiro and M Malfeito-Ferreira, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Portugal
    - Introduction - Occurrence - Spoilage activities - Metabolism and physiology of Dekkera/Brettanomyces spp - Detection and identification of Dekkera/Brettanomyces spp - Monitoring and control - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - Acknowledgments - References

PART 4 SPOILAGE MOULDS

  • General characteristics of moulds, M O Moss, University of Surrey, UK
    - Introduction to moulds: representatives of two kingdoms - The zygomycetes - The ascomycetes - The mitosporic fungi - The mycelial habit - Spoilage organisms - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Zygomycetes, J Dijksterhuis and R A Samson, Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS), The Netherlands
    - Introduction - The morphology of Zygomycetes - Growth conditions of Zygomycetes - Zygomycetes in food and industry - Zygomycetes and spoilage - How to prevent spoilage - Zygomycetes and mycotoxins - Zygomycetes and spore formation and germination - Medical aspects of Zygomycetes - Specific detection, identification and enumeration methods - Sources of further information and advice - Future trends - References
  • Penicillium and related genera, J I Pitt, Food Science Australia, Australia
    - Introduction - Taxonomy - Enumeration - Identification - Penicillium species causing food spoilage - Future trends - Conclusions - References
  • Aspergillus and related teleomorphs, A D Hocking , Food Science Australia, Australia
    - Introduction - Taxonomy - Significant Aspergillus mycotoxins - Isolation, enumeration, and identification - Teleomorphic genera with Aspergillus anamorphs - Genus Aspergillus Fr.: Fr - Aspergillus as spoilage fungi - Control measures - Future trends - Conclusions - Sources of further information - References
  • Other types of spoilage moulds, A P Williams, Williams and Neaves, The Food Microbiolgists, UK
    - Introduction - Field fungi and storage fungi - Spoilage fungi - Common foodborne moulds - Characteristics and conditions for growth/death - Isolation methods - Isolation from the air - Implications for control in main foods affected - Future trends - Sources of further information

PART 5 SPOILAGE BACTERIA

  • Pseudomonas and related genera, C-H Liao, US Department of Agriculture, USA
    - Introduction - Description of Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, and Shewanella species associated with spoilage of plant- and animal-derived foods - Detection and enumeration of Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, and Shewanella species - Factors affecting the survival and growth of Pseudomonas and Shewanella - Spoilage mechanisms employed by Pseudomonas and Shewanella - Control of Pseudomonas and Shewanella - Conclusions and future trends - Acknowledgments - References
  • Lactic acid bacteria, U Schillinger, K J Björkroth and W H Holzapfel, Institute for Hygiene and Toxicology, Germany
    - Introduction - Characteristics and conditions for lactic acid bacterium growth/death - Specific detection/identification/enumeration methods - Implications for control in foods affected - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Spore-forming bacteria, P J McClure, Unilever Colworth, UK
    - Introduction - Foods affected - Characteristics and conditions for growth and inactivation - Implications for control in foods affected - Specific detection, identification and enumeration methods - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References
  • Enterobacteriaceae, C Baylis, Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association, UK
    - Introduction - Taxonomy of the Enterobacteriaceae - Properties of the Enterobacteriaceae - Distribution and habitats of the Enterobacteriaceae - Pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae - Enterobacteriaceae in foods - Indicator function of the Enterobacteriaceae and their releveance and survival in foods - Methods for the detection and quantification of Enterobacteriaceae in foods - Food spoilage by members of the Enterobacteriaceae - Production of biogenic amines including histamine by Enterobacteriaceae - Prevention and control of spoilage by Enterobacteriaceae - Future trends - Sources of further information - References
  • Other spoilage bacteria, G Betts, Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association, UK
    - Introduction - Gram negative organisms - Gram positive organisms - Conclusions - Future trends - References
  • To find similar publications, click on a keyword below:
    Woodhead Publishing Ltd : analytical methods : bacteriology : food safety : food science : microbiology : mycology : yeast

    Terms & Conditions | Privacy Statement

    Last Modified 16/12/2013 © CPL Scientific Publishing Services Limited

    Search this site Environment Ecology Energy Bioproducts Food Biotechnology Agriculture Biocontrol & IPM Life Sciences Chemistry Business