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Bread making: Improving quality (2nd edition)

Edited by S P Cauvain 
Woodhead  April 2012  



Hardback  832 pages  ISBN 9780857090607      £180.00
The first edition of Breadmaking: improving quality quickly established itself as an essential purchase for baking professionals and researchers in this area. With comprehensively updated and revised coverage, including six new chapters, the second edition will help readers to understand the latest developments in bread making science and practice.

The book opens with two introductory chapters providing an overview of the breadmaking process. Part one focuses on the impacts of wheat and flour quality on bread, covering topics such as wheat chemistry, wheat starch structure, grain quality assessment, milling and wheat breeding. Part two covers dough development and bread ingredients, with chapters on dough aeration and rheology, the use of redox agents and enzymes in breadmaking and water control, among other topics. In part three, the focus shifts to bread sensory quality, shelf life and safety. Topics covered include bread aroma, staling and contamination. Finally, part four looks at particular bread products such as high fibre breads, those made from partially baked and frozen dough and those made from non-wheat flours.

With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, the second edition of Breadmaking: improving quality is a standard reference for researchers and professionals in the bread industry and all those involved in academic research on breadmaking science and practice.

Contents

Introduction to breadmaking S Cauvain, BakeTran, UK
- Introduction - Wheat and its special properties - Converting wheat to flour - Food safety and nutrition - Making bread - Functional ingredients - Bread in the future - References

Breadmaking: an overview S Cauvain, BakeTran, UK
- Introduction - Bread dough development - Breadmaking processes - What determines bread quality? - Dough mixing and processing - Cell creation during mixing - Dough processing - Gas bubble control during dough processing - Proving and baking - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 1 WHEAT AND FLOUR QUALITY

The chemistry and biochemistry of wheat H J Cornell, RMIT University, Australia
- The structure and composition of the wheat kernel - Wheat carbohydrates - Wheat proteins - Wheat lipids - Wheat enzymes and their roles - Pigments and their structures - Recent developments in wheat utilization - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Techniques for analyzing wheat proteins A M Gil, University of Aveiro, Portugal
- Introduction - Separation methods - Analysing molecular properties - Rheological measurements - Infrared spectroscopy - NMR spectroscopy - Electron spin resonance spectroscopy - Future trends - References

Wheat proteins and bread quality E N Clare Mills, N Wellner, L A Salt, J Robertson and J A Jenkins, Institute of Food Research, UK
- Introduction: cereal protein classification - Cereal proteins and breadmaking quality - Prolamin structure and bread quality - Soluble proteins, xylanase inhibitors and bread quality - Detergent-solubilised proteins and bread quality - Genomics and the wheat grain proteome - Conclusion and future trends - Acknowledgements - References

Wheat starch structure and bread quality A-C Eliasson, Lund University, Sweden
- Introduction: the importance of starch structure to bread quality - Starch properties and baking performance - Physico-chemical properties of starch in relation to the baking process - Starch structure and chemical composition - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Assessing grain quality C W Wrigley, Wrigley Consulting, Sydney and I L Batey, Sunset Consulting, Sydney, Australia
- Introduction - The importance of quality assessment at harvest - The grain chain - Analysis during breeding to achieve quality targets - Analysis on-farm to achieve quality targets - Sampling aims and methods - Analysis at grain receival to achieve quality targets - Analysis during storage and transport to achieve quality targets - Analysis in buying and blending to achieve flour-quality targets - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Milling and flour quality G M Campbell, C Webb and G W Owens, Satake Centre for Grain Process Engineering, University of Manchester, UK and M G Scanlon, University of Manitoba, Canada
- Introduction - Flour milling - Recent developments in flour milling - Flour milling and flour quality - Milling research - The future of flour milling - Conclusion - Acknowledgements - References

Wheat breeding and quality evaluation in the US M Tilley and Y R Chen, Center for Grain and Animal Health Research and R A Miller, Kansas State University, USA
- Introduction - Wheat classification - Selection of wheat varieties with desired characteristics - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Improving wheat protein quality for breadmaking: The role of biotechnology P R Shewry and H D Jones, Rothamsted Research, UK
- Introduction - Wheat gluten proteins and dough strength - HMW subunits and bread quality - The genetic transformation of wheat - Manipulating HMW subunit composition and dough properties - Prospects for using GM to improve wheat processing quality - Sources of further information and advice - Acknowledgements - References

Novel approaches to modify wheat flour processing characteristics and health attributes: from genetics to food technology S Islam, W Ma, G Yan, F Bekes and R Appels, CSIRO Plant Industry, Australia
- Introduction - Exploiting natural variation in gluten proteins to modify wheat quality - Genetic modification of wheat - Use of non-wheat flours to modify bread quality attributes - Modifications to reduce wheat allergy and intolerance - Conclusions - References

PART 2 DOUGH DEVELOPMENT AND PARTICULAR BREAD INGREDIENTS

Bread aeration and dough rheology: an introduction G M Campbell and P J Martin, Satake Centre for Grain Process Engineering, The University of Manchester, UK
- Introduction: the appeal of raised bread and the unique rheology of wheat flour doughs - History of bread aeration studies - History of dough rheology studies - Methods for studying bread aeration and dough rheology - Breadmaking - a series of aeration/rheology interactions - The future of bread aeration and rheology research - Conclusions - Sources of further information and advice - Acknowledgements - References

The molecular basis of bread dough rheology P S Belton, University of East Anglia, UK
- Introduction - Factors affecting dough rheology - Polymer networks in doughs - The molecular mechanism of energy storage in dough - How much dough rheology can we explain? - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

The role of water in dough formation and bread quality A Schiraldi and D Fessas, University of Milan, Italy
- Introduction - Dough as a disperse system - Water displacements and time dependent properties of the dough - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Foam formation in dough and bread quality P Wilde, Institute of Food Research, UK
- Introduction - Principles of foam formation and stability - Surface active dough components - The role of the aqueous phase of dough - Analytical techniques - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Controlling bread dough development S Millar and G Tucker, Campden BRI, UK
- Introduction - Dough rheology during mixing - Dough development - Oxidising and reducing agents - The effects of mixer type - Radical bread process - Controlling dough development - Emerging methods for controlling dough development - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Molecular mobility in dough and bread quality Y H Roos, University College Cork, Ireland
- Introduction - Molecular mobility in dough - Dough properties in baking - Controlling molecular mobility to improve bread quality - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

The use of redox agents in breadmaking H Wieser, German Research Centre of Food Chemistry, Germany
- Introduction - The redox state in flour - Redox reactions during processing - Redox agents: oxidants and reductants - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Applications of enzymes in breadmaking B A Kornbrust, Novozymes Switzerland AG, Switzerland, T Forman, Novozymes North America Inc, USA and I Matveeva, Novozymes A/S Russia, Russian Federation
- Introduction - The nature of enzymes - Commercial production of enzymes - Genetically modified organism (GMO) - Applications in breadmaking - Baking examples - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - Acknowledgements - References

Water control in breadmaking S P Cauvain and L S Young, BakeTran, UK
- Introduction - Water composition and properties - Dough formation - Proving and baking - Water activity after baking - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 3 BREAD SENSORY QUALITY, SHELF LIFE AND SAFETY

Bread aroma C Prost, P Poinot, C Rannou and G Arvisenet, LUNAM Université, Oniris, France
- Introduction - Formation of volatile compounds during breadmaking - Extraction and analysis of bread volatile compounds - Volatile composition of bread - How can bread aroma be improved? - Conclusion - Acknowledgements - References

Applications of texture analysis to dough and bread L S Young, BakeTran, UK
- Introduction - Principles and types of instrumental analysis as applied to dough - Principles and types of instrumental analysis as applied to bread - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Bread staling P Rayas-Duarte, Oklahoma State University and S Mulvaney, Cornell University, USA
- Introduction - Bread crumb structure - Bread stability - Anti-staling agents - Future trends - References

Mould prevention in bread N Magan, D Aldred and M Arroyo, Cranfield University, UK
- Introduction: the problem of moulds in bread - Current techniques for mould control and their limitations - Development of new methods for mould control - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Mycotoxin contamination of wheat, flour and bread W J de Koe, Life- and Food- Science Consultant, The Netherlands and G Juodeikiene, Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania
- Introduction: the problem of mycotoxin contamination - Some additional persistent problems of mycotoxins in the food chain - Parent mycotoxins in cereals occurring in bread and bakery products - Legislation - Development in analysis techniques - Development of non-invasive and rapid (screening) techniques - Future trends - References

PART 4 PARTICULAR BREAD PRODUCTS

Improving the quality of bread made from partially baked, refrigerated and frozen dough A Le-Bail, LUNAM Université, Oniris, France and D Gabric, Zagreb University, Croatia
- Introduction - Frozen part baked technology - Non-fermented frozen dough technology - Pre-fermented frozen dough technology - Energy demand for the bake off technologies - Conclusions - References

Nutritionally enhanced wheat flours and breads C M Rosell, Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA-CSIC), Spain
- Introduction - Nutritional value of wheat - Effect of processing on the nutritrional value of wheat - Different approaches to increase the nutritional value of wheat flour - Nutritional improvement of wheat flours during breadmaking performance - Ingredients for enriching wheat baked goods - Conclusions - Sources of further information and advice - References

Formulating breads for specific dietary requirements A S Hager, E Zannini and E K Arendt, University College Cork, Ireland
- Introduction - Wheat allergy and coeliac disease - Glycemic index and glycemic load - Bread high in dietary fibre - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Improving the quality of high-fibre breads K Hartikainen and K Katina, VTT, Finland
- Introduction - Sources of fibre - Challenges in high-fibre baking - Improving the quality of fibre enriched foods - Future trends - References

Quality of breads made with non-wheat flours K G Duodu and John R N Taylor, University of Pretoria, South Africa
- Introduction - Non-wheat pan breads - Traditional non-wheat bread products - Quality issues - Future trends - References

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